Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Next Book Is About Her Late Father

Notes on Grief will explore collective mourning through the late James Nwoye Adichie’s life as a Biafran War survivor and statistics professor.
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Notes on Grief.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Notes on Grief.

Following her father’s death last year, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie wrote a reflection in The New Yorker titled “Notes on Grief.” Now she has expanded the memoir into a book-length work—chapbook, likely—that explores collective grief during the pandemic, “the familial and cultural dimensions of grief, and the loneliness and anger that accompany it.” It will center her father’s life, “a remarkable man of kindness and charm” who survived the Biafran War of 1967-70 and was Nigeria’s first professor of statistics.

Professor James Nwoye Adichie’s stories of the Biafran War were among Adichie’s sources for her monumental second novel Half of a Yellow Sun. He died from kidney failure.  

Adichie’s UK publisher 4th Estate describes the memoir as “a timely and deeply personal … work of meditation, remembrance and hope.”

It is, “a moving tribute to the father Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie loved fiercely and whose sudden death devastated her,” 4th Estate editor Nick Pearson told The Guardian. “It will be treasured by readers for the light it sheds on the pain of navigating the loss of someone we love.”

Notes on Grief will be published by 4th Estate on 11 May 2021.

Otosirieze Obi-Young
Otosirieze Obi-Young is the founder and editor-in-chief of Open Country Mag. He is a writer, culture journalist, curator, former academic, and media consultant. Until recently, he was editor of Folio Nigeria, CNN’s exclusive media affiliate in Africa, where he profiled innovators in over 20 fields, including art, music, tech, sports, cuisine, fashion, beauty, health, and activism. He sat on the judging panel of The Morland Scholarship, a British grant for African writers, and currently chairs the panel of The Gerald Kraak Prize, a South African initiative for storytelling about gender, sexuality, and social justice. His fiction has appeared in The Threepenny Review and Transition. In 2019, he received the inaugural The Future Awards Africa Prize for Literature. In 2020, he was named among “The 100 Most Influential Young Nigerians” by Avance Media. Website: otosirieze.com.
Open Country Mag Recommends

by Ernest Ogunyemi

Thirteen years after he started it, his debut novel The Madhouse finally arrives. This chronicle of the ‘90s, set in northern Nigeria, broadens the familiar for the 29-year-old.
Top Stories

Get the latest, in-depth stories on African literature: reviews, Profiles, events, opportunities, conversations, & More.

All important literary news in your Inbox.

We respect your privacy and will never send you Spam or sell your email. 

Top