Submit Your Collection to the Glenna Luschei Prize for African Poetry

Submitted books must be in English.
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Chapbooks from African Poetry Book Fund's box set Nne. Credit: Kimberly Ann Southwick. From blog.pshares.org.

Chapbooks from African Poetry Book Fund's box set Nne. Credit: Kimberly Ann Southwick. From blog.pshares.org.

The Glenna Luschei Prize for African Poetry is accepting submissions until October 2021. It is awarded yearly to an original full-length poetry collection by an African writer published in the previous year. The prize is worth $1,000.

Submitted books must be in English; translations will also be considered. Self-published books and books published by the APBF and the African Poetry Series are not eligible.

The prize, founded in 2015, is named for Glenna Luschei, a literary philanthropist, and is administered by the African Poetry Book Fund in partnership with Prairie Schooner.

Previous winners include amu nnadi’s through the window of a sandcastle, Rethabile Masilo’s Waslap, Koleka Putuma’s Collective Amnesia. South African mangaliso buzani’s a naked bone is its most recent winner.

To submit, mail four copies of the book to:

The Glenna Luschei Poetry Prize

The African Poetry Book Fund

Prairie Schooner

110 Andrews Hall

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Lincoln, NE 68588-0334.

Visit here to read more.

Ernest Ogunyemi
Ernest O. Ògúnyẹmí is a staff writer at Open Country Mag. His works have recently appeared/are forthcoming in AGNI, Joyland, No Tokens, Olongo Africa, The Dark, Fiyah, Agbowó, Southern Humanities Review, Minnesota Review, McNeese Review, Down River Road, and West Trade Review. He is the curator of The Fire That Is Dreamed of: The Young African Poets Anthology.
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