Leila Chatti & Eloghosa Osunde to Judge Fugue Contests

The winners, in the two categories of fiction and poetry, will each receive $1000 and their work will appear in an issue of the publication.
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Fugue, issue 49 (2015).

Fugue, issue 49 (2015).

The American journal Fugue runs yearly contests for short story writers, essayists, and poets. The Nigerian writer Eloghosa Osunde and the Tunisian poet Leila Chatti are the judges for this year. Osunde will judge the prose contest, Chatti the poetry contest. The deadline for submissions is 2 April 2020.

Founded in the University of Idaho, Fugue has championed the work of new writers as well as established writers for the past three decades. The magazine is published biannually; the contests are held annually. The winner in each category receives $1000 and their work will appear in an issue of the publication.

Past judges of the contests have included Dorianne Laux, Mark Doty, and Chen Chen. Past winners: Zinnia Smith, Seth Simons, and Arah Ko, among others.

Eloghosa Osunde is a multidisciplinary artist whose work engages mental health, sexuality, and identity. She won a 2017 Miles Morland Scholarship and is a 2019 Lambda Literary Fellow and a 2020 MacDowell Colony Fellow. Her debut novel, Vagabonds, is forthcoming from Riverhead Books.

Leila Chatti is a Tunisian-American poet. She is the author of Deluge, her debut full-length poetry collection, published last year by Copper Canyon Press. In 2017, she was shortlisted for the Brunel International African Poetry Prize. Currently, she lectures at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, as the Mendota Lecturer in Poetry.

To submit to the contest, visit here.

Ernest Ogunyemi
Ernest O. Ògúnyẹmí is a staff writer at Open Country Mag. His works have recently appeared/are forthcoming in AGNI, Joyland, No Tokens, Olongo Africa, The Dark, Fiyah, Agbowó, Southern Humanities Review, Minnesota Review, McNeese Review, Down River Road, and West Trade Review. He is the curator of The Fire That Is Dreamed of: The Young African Poets Anthology.
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