Search Results for: 20.35 africa

October 13, 2022

The first internship is for graphic design and the second is editorial.

September 17, 2022

These “conversations are as absurd as they are beautiful,” writes the poetry series’ managing editor Precious Okpechi. “This is what literature does: bare life’s absurdity and beauty.”

April 9, 2022

“It’s not just about developing platforms for African poets. What is the bigger picture?” asks the Nigerian poet and editor of the collective. “We are thinking of training, models that feed capacity, that enhance their craft and careers.”

August 20, 2021

“What we bring is a seminal thinking of poetry,” writes the poetry series’ editor-in-chief Ebenezer Agu. “We must recognize the beauty and complexity of this transcreation.”

May 13, 2021

By creating a space to both nurture and pay emerging voices, 20.35 Africa can continue to stand as a home for robust literary support.

February 4, 2021

The anthology is open to African poets between the ages of 20, or who would be 20 by the time of publication, and 35.

January 11, 2021

By publishing poets both at the center and in the margins of the scene, 20.35 Africa has become a major resource institution for African poets.

January 9, 2021

These poems hold some of the most visceral and philosophical stanzas you’ll read in any anthology, in any country.

August 5, 2023

20.35 Africa Vol. VI, edited by Nick Makoha and Safia Jama, is introduced by the series’ managing editor Precious Okpechi: “The poets understand that history evolves with us.”

November 4, 2022

Even as we cross industries, our angle of storytelling remains to be revelatory, and our style literary.

April 8, 2022

Originally planned for December 2021, to mark our first anniversary, our in-depth special issue profiles 16 African writers and curators who have impacted, disrupted, reshaped, and even created literary culture in the last five years.

August 18, 2021

June 2, 2021

The 20.35 Africa collective member will use the time to finish her collection of poetry.

January 11, 2024

From Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Teju Cole, and Leila Aboulela to DK Nnuro, Momtaza Mehri, and Fatin Abbas: the notable books of 2023 by Africans.

November 28, 2023

In their debut novel-in-stories Vagabonds!, the Nigerian writer and visual artist pursues an alternate reality of their mind, taking on, among other subjects, social normalcy, gender, and queerness.

November 28, 2023

The Ghanaian American author of What Napoleon Could Not Do, a summer reading pick by Barack Obama, has been thinking about art in our contemporary times.

August 17, 2023

As conversations sethe about the “death” of Nigerian literature and the loss of authenticity in its poetry, a writer counters for the growing japa-MFA subculture: “I call them the Nomadic Generation because of their complication of nationalism.”

July 23, 2022

The influential Chinese American novelist on running the famed program, new African writing, MFAs, literary genres, and her novel The Family Chao. “There is the possibility of creating the conversation that brings in as many voices as possible,” she said of the Workshop.

October 13, 2022

The first internship is for graphic design and the second is editorial.

September 17, 2022

These “conversations are as absurd as they are beautiful,” writes the poetry series’ managing editor Precious Okpechi. “This is what literature does: bare life’s absurdity and beauty.”

April 9, 2022

“It’s not just about developing platforms for African poets. What is the bigger picture?” asks the Nigerian poet and editor of the collective. “We are thinking of training, models that feed capacity, that enhance their craft and careers.”

August 20, 2021

“What we bring is a seminal thinking of poetry,” writes the poetry series’ editor-in-chief Ebenezer Agu. “We must recognize the beauty and complexity of this transcreation.”

May 13, 2021

By creating a space to both nurture and pay emerging voices, 20.35 Africa can continue to stand as a home for robust literary support.

February 4, 2021

The anthology is open to African poets between the ages of 20, or who would be 20 by the time of publication, and 35.

January 11, 2021

By publishing poets both at the center and in the margins of the scene, 20.35 Africa has become a major resource institution for African poets.

January 9, 2021

These poems hold some of the most visceral and philosophical stanzas you’ll read in any anthology, in any country.

August 5, 2023

20.35 Africa Vol. VI, edited by Nick Makoha and Safia Jama, is introduced by the series’ managing editor Precious Okpechi: “The poets understand that history evolves with us.”

November 4, 2022

Even as we cross industries, our angle of storytelling remains to be revelatory, and our style literary.

April 8, 2022

Originally planned for December 2021, to mark our first anniversary, our in-depth special issue profiles 16 African writers and curators who have impacted, disrupted, reshaped, and even created literary culture in the last five years.

August 18, 2021

The poetry collection was first published by Griots Lounge Publishing Canada.

June 2, 2021

The 20.35 Africa collective member will use the time to finish her collection of poetry.

January 11, 2024

From Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Teju Cole, and Leila Aboulela to DK Nnuro, Momtaza Mehri, and Fatin Abbas: the notable books of 2023 by Africans.

November 28, 2023

In their debut novel-in-stories Vagabonds!, the Nigerian writer and visual artist pursues an alternate reality of their mind, taking on, among other subjects, social normalcy, gender, and queerness.

November 28, 2023

The Ghanaian American author of What Napoleon Could Not Do, a summer reading pick by Barack Obama, has been thinking about art in our contemporary times.

August 17, 2023

As conversations sethe about the “death” of Nigerian literature and the loss of authenticity in its poetry, a writer counters for the growing japa-MFA subculture: “I call them the Nomadic Generation because of their complication of nationalism.”

July 23, 2022

The influential Chinese American novelist on running the famed program, new African writing, MFAs, literary genres, and her novel The Family Chao. “There is the possibility of creating the conversation that brings in as many voices as possible,” she said of the Workshop.

“An ambitious new magazine that is committed to African literature"

- Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Get the essential stories in African literature + Nigerian film and TV: in-depth, thought-provoking Profiles, features, reviews, and conversations, as well as news on events and opportunities.

We respect your privacy and will never send you Spam or sell your email.

Search

Top